researchED 2017 National Conference

researchED 2017 National Conference

Saturday 09 September, 09:45 - 16:45

Come and see us at the GL Assessment stand at the researchED 2017 National Conference.

researchED’s annual conference is back! The national conference is where the best minds and voices in education from the UK and beyond are presented. Come and hear what the latest and best research has to offer your schools, classrooms and students, and speak to the researchers, teachers and academics behind it.

Many of our assessments, such as CAT4, NGRT and the Progress Test Series, have been used in a number of educational research papers supported through the Education Endowment Foundation and leading academic institutions.

We work with a number of educational experts to deliver assessments that are grounded in the latest, high-quality research. In addition, we have our own in-house team of pychometricians, statisticians and researchers who make major contributions to the field of educational research. 

For more information about the event and list of speakers, visit the researchED website. You are also invited to attend our sessions at the conference, detailed below.

Putting research into practice

There’s a lot of educational research out there - good, great and otherwise - and a big challenge is channelling this research into the classroom and putting it into practice. This panel will debate how research findings can best be disseminated and implemented on the ground, covering issues such as:

  • What research should teachers know about?
  • Which research has gained most traction with schools – and why?
  • Where are the hidden gems: which pieces of research are worthy of having a higher profile?
  • How can we help ensure the findings of research are implemented in schools, and how can we evaluate its impact?
  • Is research evidence more useful at an individual / teacher level or at a school level as a way of conducting school improvement in a disciplined (inquiry) way?
  • How can research be used to support teachers with recent changes to the curriculum and assessment?
  • How can we get colleagues more engaged with research?

 Our panellists are:

Chair: Hilary Fine, Senior Publisher, GL Assessment

Summer Turner, a Subject Specialist Lead for English at the Inspiration Trust

Chris Dale, Director of Teaching and Learning and Research School, Samuel Ward Academy Trust

Daisy Christodoulou, Director of Education, No More Marking

Carl Hendrick, Head of Learning and Research at Wellington College

Leading MAT level change – towards an evidence-based approach to classroom practice

Chris Dale – Director of Teaching and Learning and Research School, Samuel Ward Academy Trust

Fundamentally this session aims to provide a think piece that considers a range of leadership ‘levers’ in driving through evidence based changes within a medium-sized rural Multi Academy Trust.  The discussion will attempt to justify and evaluate the impact of these and also consider how to foster deep motivation in staff to make these changes.

The Samuel Ward Academy Trust is a MAT of 21 schools and has more than tripled in size over the last 18 months.  This session will outline the journey since January 2017 to start to define and embed a more nuanced, balanced and evidence based approach to teaching and learning.

The session will be framed by a brief discussion and reflection on the key principles of the McKinsey report on World leading systems and also Cotter’s 8 Stages for Change Management.

Key is when and how MATs should mandate a policy or leadership action and when to allow more individual school autonomy and freedom.  For example, the development of the teaching and learning policy will be compared and contrasted with gaining Research School status and the design of the SWAT Teacher Enquiry Cycle.  The session will conclude with further reflection and next steps.

What you'll learn...

  • What research should teachers know about?
  • Which research has gained most traction with schools – and why?
  • How can we help ensure the findings of research are implemented in schools, and how can we evaluate its impact?
  • Is research evidence more useful at an individual / teacher level or at a school level as a way of conducting school improvement in a disciplined (inquiry) way?

Location

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