Published on: 12 May 2017

My personal highlight of the conference was hearing Nicola Lambros discuss the importance of student self-efficacy and how she utilises PASS to help improve outcomes by focusing on pupil wellbeing
James Neill, International Director, GL Education

This Week: at the 36th COBIS Annual Conference

This week over 700 educators gathered at the wonderful setting of the Intercontinental London – The O2 for the 36th COBIS Annual Conference. Held over the course of three days, the conference presented the perfect opportunity for members of the largest association for British overseas schools to network, gaining valuable insight into the world of education and around this year’s theme of ‘Transformations’.

Our international division, GL Education, has had the pleasure of working closely with COBIS over the past five years and along with being key sponsors of the busy conference, we hosted our own pre-conference event where Matthew Savage (Acting Principal at International Community School, Amman) explored the idea of the ‘Mona Lisa Effect’, in which he emphasised the importance of needing to be able to follow pupils throughout their entire journey at school in order to fully appreciate the complete picture of each pupil.

My personal highlight of the conference was hearing Nicola Lambros (Deputy Head at King’s College Madrid) discuss the importance of student self-efficacy and how she utilises PASS to help improve outcomes by focusing on pupil wellbeing. She demonstrated the detrimental impact low self-belief can have on pupil performance and how the focus needed to shift from grades to other key areas like critical thinking, study skills and self-belief – shifting the focus on these three areas will, in turn, have a positive impact on grades and outcomes. Nicola outlined her strategy for success during the session, citing the important role PASS data has in creating positive change in pupil performance.

Nicola has also contributed to our recently launched report on ‘Personalised Learning’, outlining the sometimes difficult task of identifying gifted and talented pupils in international schools, particularly with students who speak English as an Additional Language (EAL). The usual methods of teacher observation and judgement need to be weighed up with both clear summative and formative assessment results. However, the biggest issue is the potential for EAL pupils to be overlooked purely because of language barriers. At GL Education, we have a range of assessments to help supplement teacher judgement and Nicola seamlessly describes the power that certain tools like CAT4 and PASS can have in every classroom.

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